Weekly Schedule

I’ve been posting each day since I upgraded to a Personal Plan. One looming feeling I’ve had was my pace in writing. I have prompts, but not all prompts are that good. Plus, I don’t want to use up all my good prompts in less than a month. So, I’ve come up with a schedule to help inspire me to write.


Monday

Every Monday, I’ll be posting a poem to start off the week. For some reason, Mondays just feel like a good day for something creative.

Tuesday

Tuesday will be for my opinionated posts and prompts. Some Tuesday posts will be reactions to Monday’s news. Most of the news comes out on Mondays, so I’ll pick one that fancy and react to it.

Wednesday

Wednesdays will be for short stories. I’ve always seen myself as a pseudo writer haha! Ha…

Thursdays

My love for Japan has no bounds (actually there is), so Thursdays are dedicated for all things Japanese: my progress in studying Japanese, my progress in job hunting as an EFL teacher, news from Japan, music, TV shows maybe, etc.

Friday

Friday will be regular blog day. I’ll blog about what I did throughout the week and maybe blog about things from the past. Who knows?

Saturday

Every Saturday, I would wrap up what happened on the website. Saturdays would basically be a weekend roundup of the past week. I’ll also see if I was able to finish all the things I set myself to do the Sunday before.

Sunday

Every Sunday, I’ll write about my plans for the coming week. What sort of goals I’ve set myself. Who I’ll meet. What I’ll do. That sort of thing.


I hope this schedule will allow me to grow as a writer. Setting restrictions actually challenge people to think outside the box. Speaking of a challenge, I’ll try to limit myself to 5 paragraphs at most per website entry. If I can’t get the message across in 5 paragraphs, I probably need to work on my writing.

Plus, I won’t be following this schedule to a tee since I could get a burst of inspiration and feel like publishing it on that day would be more appropriate.

What Is It like to Grow up in the Philippines?

Before you get into this entry, let me eradicate your expectation. This isn’t some puff piece of how I felt growing up here in the Philippines (if you really want to read something like that, you can read one of my entries). This is about what it’s like growing up under President Duterte. When I came up with this idea, I didn’t want this to become a political piece. I also don’t want to use theories and ideas from Political Science since this is not what this site is for. Of course, I won’t spurt out baseless ideas without facts.

This essay was inspired by The Learning Network’s prompt: Is It Harder to Grow Up in the 21st Century Than It Was in the Past? There is also an Opinion piece written by David Brooks titled A Generation Emerging From the Wreckage. You should give that a read as well since that helped me frame my mind for this entry. And if you don’t know about President Duterte, the Philippine Daily Inquirer published The Duterte Administration: Year in Review. It’s not a complete picture, but it’s a great place to start.


All things I say are purely my opinions and my observations, but I will never make assumptions based on nothing. So to answer the title, it’s very frustrating and extremely disappointing to be growing up in this regime. When people vote for a person, they place trust in that person and the institution to lift people’s standard of living (in my personal opinion, the standard of living is what all governments of the world should focus on improving). However, I don’t see that happening with Duterte’s administration. When he was still running for president, I was actually still hopeful of the change he promised. He’s definitely known for wielding an iron fist, but I thought that discipline could be a good wakeup call for all politicians. In fact, I even wrote a paper on it.

One of the earliest blunders of Duterte was the campaign of War On Drugs (read the latest article* from the Inquirer and Rappler). This campaign was supposed to “clean” the Philippines of drugs, but it has set a veil of fear over the population. No one knows who’s going to die next. It could be someone we know like a friend or a neighbour. Small-time drug dealers and unfortunate innocents get shot without prejudice, yet alleged big game drug lords are getting some form of special treatment (read the articles from Inquirer, CNN Philippines, and Rappler).

So there’s a state of fear, anger, uncertainty, mistrust, and disappointment. But I think what’s most frustrating is that people are now afraid to speak out since there’s a possibility of being shot. Last year, Ateneo de Manila University had a rally outside the campus calling to stop the extrajudicial killing, but they were met with a police car with no license plate (read the article on The Guidon and The Inquirer).

One paragraph of Brooks’ essay actually does ring true to the young generation of the Philippines:

The students spent a lot of time debating how you organize an effective movement. One pointed out that today’s successful movements, like Black Lives Matter and #MeToo, don’t have famous figureheads or centralized structures. Some students embraced these dispersed, ground-up and spontaneous organizations. If they flame out after a few months, so what? They did their job. Others thought that, no, social movements have to grow institutional structures if they are going to last, and they have to get into politics if they are going to produce any serious change.

In my previous post, I talked about why I had low political participation, but I guess I forgot to mention the dangerous environment where free speech could be seen as a weapon against the government. But there are young individuals like Sarah Elago who has gotten into politics, and I can’t wait to see what kind of change she can bring. I guess I should add ‘being hopeful’ as one of the answers to my main question.

It’s Samme!

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Let's go fam!

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Around a year ago in a cafe near where I lived, there came a group of girls whom I never saw before. This was new to me since I pretty much knew everyone at the cafe. They were a lot of them at first, but as graduation came and went, they trickled down to just three: Samme (the one in stripes above), Lans (the one not in stripes above), and Drei (the one that’s not in the picture above). We four plus two other guys, Renz and Jules, got close at the cafe. We’d often share stories and dreams about the future.

But ever since the cafe went on hiatus, I don’t get to see them that often. So when Samme told us to go watch her perform with I-SA at their concert, I couldn’t say no.

Lans and I agreed to meet at SM Megamall at 5PM on the day of the concert. I, being the always-early-never-late-I-hate-Filipino-time kind of person that I am, got there at 3:30PM. I immediately regretted it because I forgot how much I hated SM malls. These malls are always crowded, and I hate to say it, but I also hate the crowd. So I found myself a nice little spot at Chelsea Kitchen that was away from the people and worked on finishing Hokkaido Part 3 through the WordPress app on my phone.

Lans soon arrived, and we probably talked a good 20 minutes about Korean boys! After a while, we got Samme a red velvet cupcake from Cupcakes by Sonja as a gift for doing a good job on the concert (she loved the cupcake) and left for UA&P. Lans talked about how she was so hot as Romeo at her play, and schoolgirls were taking photos of her. Then we bumped into Samme’s sister and mother along the way and almost got run over by some cars (in my defence, there wasn’t any indication whatsoever that the lights were about to change). When we got to the main gate, the guards told us that the concert was at the back of the campus, so we had to walk another 10 minutes. Samme greeted us at the lobby, and Lans got to work on her makeup while I munched down on some Korean chips and yoghurt ice cream.

Samme’s sister and mother soon arrived and we all entered the theatre. We watched a good 20 minutes of advertisements till will decided to buy some food at the Korean grocery. We came back, and the show was already starting.

It’s been a while since I watched a performance on stage, and I was really glad that I did come to see it. The former president of I-SA was an amazing dancer, especially during her solo performances. The entire production was pretty good: good use of lights, of video, of music etc. What I didn’t expect was that there would be a story to their entire production. If I remember correctly, it was about chasing something/someone you want and to not be afraid of doing it. There were different storylines with different conflicts and resolutions.

But what really caught my eye was the happiness I could feel on that stage. They loved dancing on stage, and it made me miss my musical theatre days. It reminded me of the lights shining on my face, the floorboards on my feet, the characters we took in, and strangely the smell of the air. That was a nice life that I had, but loving the one I have now is better than reminiscing my glory days. It great to see young souls shine so bright. I love it!

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Why I Don’t Talk About Politics

So a couple of days ago Android Authority released a video essay titled The Truth Behind The Facebook Privacy Scandal – The Real World Matrix, and this got me thinking about my inaction of political participation. I asked myself, “why am I not as vocal as my other friends who took political science?” Sure, I share news on my FB, but I really don’t make an effort to comment or to start a discussion on what I shared. I couldn’t think of a reason why my political participation was so low until I read Rappler’s piece titled Sarah Elago on why being young and being a dissenter matters.

Ms. Elago is a perfect example of an anti-thesis to me (or maybe I’m an anti-thesis to her). So another question would be, why am I not like her? Why am I not trying to create an arena of discourse in order to find this elusive paradigm shift? Then I remembered the advice that my boss told me. “What are you going to sacrifice in order for you to achieve your goal?”

And for new readers here, my goal has always personal growth and the pursuit of happiness. I think that’s why I don’t post about politics. What I mostly post are positive reinforcements and my progress in self-improvement. I feel like I’ve made more strides in improving myself than trying to make a cohesive arena for discourse. Obviously, trying to change the political landscape is harder than changing a single person. But think of it this way. How can I help others if I can’t help myself? If I want to help people become better people, then I should be a better person.

Upgraded my WP

This is going to be a quick post.

I saw an email from WP today telling me that they were offering a 30% off discount on all of their plans, so I grabbed the Personal Plan. I changed my URL to patrickalix.com and the site title to my name. I also changed my author name and author icon. Continue reading “Upgraded my WP”