To the Political Parties in My University

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DEAR TAPAT AND SANTUGON,

I passed by your “miting de avance” expecting no more from you, and you’ve met my criteria for low standards. Yes, once again you’ve disappointed me. You stood there, rallying your troops in hopes to convince those who are in the Ampitheatre that you are the better option. Your parties’ population combined was literally more than twice the potential voters who sat, interestingly, between the two parties, acting as a buffer. Your meeting and efforts were practically useless in my opinion. Please, don’t give me that hopeful thought of “Those who were there will spread our ideas and platforms” because they won’t. They’ll probably forget about them when they get home only because there are more important matters to take care of than trying to remember the candidates for college batch president, whose name must have been echoed over and over–to a point where the bearers think of themselves at the third person. Sure enough, you’ll immediately throw Article III Section 4 of the 1987 Constitution (I can hear you googling); I’ll give you credit for that, but just partially since you seem to be taking advantage of it. Speaking of echoing, why are you so intent on getting your own party to echo your ideas–literally echo what you’ve just said. Aren’t you supposed to convince the potential voters? I’ve seen these buffer people; they were most probably sitting there thinking, “Oh, this is rather entertaining. I’m glad I came here to kill time,” or perhaps, “Why are they saying it again? I heard you the first time.” One thing is sure; they were just sitting. I swear, the most enthusiastic people at the “meeting” were those coming from your own parties. You are well aware that your own parties support you, so why excite them more than they already are? You know they’ll vote for the party they represent. Go for the voters for crying out loud! In fact, before initiating the Miting de Avance, make sure that the people who matter the most are the majority. And if you haven’t figured that out by now, they’re the voters. If your current strategies don’t convince the voters otherwise, you should know something’s not right. I’m not saying that you’re doing it wrong–wait. No. I am saying that you are doing it wrong. Just because COMELEC doesn’t set the ‘right’ parameters on how to do your campaign that doesn’t give you the incentive to act like beheaded chickens. Surely, you have the resources to produce original plans. So what if your strategies have been tried and tested! Sir Ken Robinson back in his 2006 TED talk said, “If you’re not prepared to be wrong, you’ll never come up with anything original.” Common sense, innovativeness, courage, and creativity seem to have been muted from your repetitive ‘howling technique’. My professors, who spent more years teaching than being an undergrad at DLSU, are always annoyed each time you knock at their doors. Please, don’t think that you’re not bothering us when you are granted permission to campaign in our rooms, because you are a bother.

A friend of mine said that the independent candidate has the most realistic platforms out of all of you; unfortunately, I have not had the pleasure to meet this person. [If you’re interested in his platform, click here.] You can see what you can achieve when you look at students at uni from a different perspective—especially when you see them as students. Get your eyes out of those shades of yellow and orange, and see what the students need and NOT what you THINK the students need.

To H.E. Chinese Ambassador Ma Keqing

My professor instructed us to attend a forum on China‘s foreign policy making. She also instructed us to create a paper on it, and here it is.

A Reaction to H.E. Chinese Ambassador Ma Keqing

A forum on China’s foreign policy was held last Friday at William Hall Theatre, and the guest of honour was none other than Her Excellency Chinese Ambassador to the Philippines, Ma Keqing. This forum was held two days after Xi Jinping succeeded as General Secretary of the Communist Party of China, the highest rank any official could achieve, which was preceeded by China’s current President, Hu Jintao. In all honesty, I was quite surprised that the Ambassador agreed to have this forum when she would most often decline television interviews on the matter of the West Philippine Sea dispute. Most, if not all of us were expecting to hear the Ambassador talk on that issue; although, we partially knew that the forum would not come to that. Tensions are high as they all ready are; I believe that tackling that maritime issue would only ensue more anxiety and degrade the image of the university. There are some details that the Ambassador talked about that came into my attention: 1) the economic improvements of China during its past years, 2) the fact that it is not China’s intention to be a state that expresses aggressive military power, and that 3) China has always been about peace and cooperation with its neighbours. Continue reading “To H.E. Chinese Ambassador Ma Keqing”

Do I Ever Smile?

 

My mother asks this a lot, “How come you don’t smile anymore?” Now, don’t get me wrong. I do smile, though very rarely. If you see me at uni (this is how I’m calling my university, De La Salle University, from now on. I refer to it as campus to my friends, as in, “Are you on campus?) with my friends, I’m probably laughing and having a good time. It’s just normal human behaviour to enjoy the company of those you are close to. But, I’m rarely with my friends at uni nor do we have the time to just sit around and do whatever. Anyway, point is, my friends see me as this cheery and chummy guy, but they’ve never seen me when I’m not with them.

I am so emotionless, I make Mona Lisa look bipolar; I make myself look like Bella Swan’s twin (I know right?) Damn, even Curiosity had more emotions when it landed on Mars than when I try to have a conversation with my mother. I’m just a huge pile of dead. Continue reading “Do I Ever Smile?”

The Breakaway

So a week ago, I got a class at DLSU, which I thought was creative writing for fiction or non-fiction. It was–much to my surprise–creative writing for poetry. Poetry class was not something I was hoping for, since I did want to learn how to write literature. I’ve been planning to write a book ever since I got into my university. I just don’t have the knowledge and experience to write it. (Experience=life experience. Not as a writer, but as a person).

Our professor told us to get a brand new notebook for journal entries. He wants us to see how we think and how we give our opinions on something–which I believe I am excellent in doing aka blogging. Basically, he wants to know that we are alive, and I do mean that in the most literal of sense hahahaha! Our first entry: anything you want to talk about. So here’s what I said. (The following has been greatly edited and improved.) Continue reading “The Breakaway”

God is not a Good Excuse


I’m a Buddhist, and many people know this. Even my father knows this. He seems to have a habit of making arguments that just sound really stupid. I’ll talk about that soon, and I promise to keep this post on topic as much as I possibly can, since I have a tendency to deviate.

A few days ago, I had a talk with my tall-hairy-Italian friend (you know who you are) about my father. And I shall now tell you what I told my friend. As I said from the start, I am a Buddhist, and I have a very open mind to many things (as should everybody else). I have no qualms about any religion. Although, when the people who practice it step over the line, well…

I’m not sure if I wrote this in my blog; my father is now a Born Again Christian. He told me this when I had to pay my respects to a relative who passed away this year. So, anyway. For some reason, he is now much more eager to convert me back to Christianity. Oh, the things we discussed that day. He was so silly and fallacious, quite funny even when you dissect the structures of his arguments. Oops, off topic again. Continue reading “God is not a Good Excuse”